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Toronto Real Estate Blog
Be(a)ware of the Bully Bid
Wednesday, 22 February 2012, 05:16:51 PM

Over the last couple of months I have seen a substantial increase in “bully bids”. A bully bid is otherwise known as a preemptive offer on a home accepting offers on a specified date. Holding back offers or specifying a particular offer date has been common practice in Toronto for the past decade or so.

Now, more buyers are using the preemptive offer as a strategy to gain leverage in a seller’s market. It doesn’t always work, but it’s something that both buyers and sellers need to be aware when they’re “in the market”.

As an agent, I have been on both sides of bully bids (representing buyers who wish to aggressively go after a property as well as representing the sellers end of the transaction when would be buyers are trying to “bully” their way to the front of the line).

When you are selling your home, you need to be aware that you may get an offer before the offer acceptance date. You do need to have a conversation with your real estate agent to make sure you discuss this scenario and how to re-act to such an offer.  Your agent should also give you an expected sale price (usually a range betweeen 1-2%) and an approximate number of offers that you might expect.  Having myself represented sellers countless times on offer nights, it’s more of an art than a science in predicting the number of offers, but having a sense of what to expect is good if you’re presented with a bully offer.

My advice to sellers is that’s it’s always better to wait until the offer date than to accept a preemptive offer. The only exception to that rule is of course if the offer is “too good to be true” and significantly better than the “market” value.

On the flip side, if you’re a buyer you need to be aware of the bully bid for two reasons.  Firstly, if you a home is newly listed on MLS and is holding back offers until the following week, don’t wait to see the home. Why? It might by sold the time the weekend rolls around.  The chances are slim, but definitely possible. You don’t want regret about not seeing that great house that sold before you even got a chance to see it. New house listings typically come out on Tuesdays, Wednesdays or Thursdays and I always recommend to clients to see the home within the first day or two of being on the market.

The second reason - if you do find that “perfect home” you should at the very least consider a pre-emptive offer. I am not suggesting you should bully bid, but at the very least you should consider the option. In this case you would have to prepare a very strong offer and give the sellers only a few hours to consider the offer. It does throw the listing agent off their game and they’ll scramble to try to drum up competing offers. This strategy doesn’t always work and there are definitely risks involved in doing this, but as buyer should be aware this as a possible option.

This real estate market is still very much a seller’s market and you need to be aware of the different options available to you when competing with other buyers and sellers.

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